Poll: Over 1 In 4 Americans Say It May Be Necessary To Take Up Arms Against The Government

Last week, the University of Chicago’s Institute of Politics released an unsettling poll. The poll was conducted by Republican pollster Neil Newhouse and Democratic pollster Joel Benenson. The goal behind the survey was to find out just how polarized voters in the United States are and how their relationship to news sources coincides.



The survey consisted of 1000 registered voters, and the results are chilling. When asked if they thought “it may be necessary at some point soon for citizens to take up arms against the government,” 28% of the voters polled said yes.

 

Chart is sourced from The University Of Chicago Institute Of Politics.

 

Isn’t it interesting that a letter written by John Adams, one of the founding fathers of the United States, stated that he believed that only 33% of the early Americans were actually in favor of the Revolution against the British?

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If this is to be believed, then we are only 3% away from the boiling point that led to the American Revolution.

I realize this is only a poll of 1000 people, but we need to take notice of the quickly shifting political climate.

For the past several years, the political climate has gone from warm to boiling as issues with sharp differing opinions have emerged at the forefront of party politics.

Take the issue of abortion, for instance. On one side, you have people that firmly believe that if you oppose abortion, you are stripping women of their fundamental rights to their own bodies. Think about that for a second. If you really believe that, taking away access to abortions means that you are putting women on the same level as enslaved people. Slaves didn’t have the rights to their own bodies; their masters did.

On the other side of the coin, you have people who believe that abortions end a defenseless child’s life. If you really believe that, continuing to allow abortions to be legal is akin to allowing a modern-day holocaust to continue unchecked.

This issue is a hill on which both sides of the argument would be willing to take a stand and give their life for their conviction. On one side, you have opponents of abortion. Fifty years of precedence means nothing in comparison to the lives lost. On the other side, you have proponents of abortion, worried that women’s rights will be a thing of the past.

As we remember the 4th of July, we reflect upon the 33% of Americans who rose up against the tyranny put upon the colonies. What was their cry? Taxation without representation.



We now are in a time in America where it doesn’t matter which way you legislate on some of the red-hot issues plaguing the political landscape. You will have close to 50% of the country hating the ruling and a certain percentage of them wanting to take up arms to settle the disagreement.

Where do we go from here? Abraham Lincoln quoted Jesus Christ, saying, “A house divided against itself cannot stand.”

As it stands, many dividing ideologies stem from a “new” way of looking at the world, the reason we are here, and what the future of earth will look like. Intellectuals are pushing the liberal agendas on the youth of America, and in another 20 years, the push will be complete unless a pushback happens.

The pushback will need to retrace the same steps. There would have to be a radical change in the education system, entertainment agendas, and the media to make a difference.

One side or the other will eventually win over the youth of America. At this point, it looks like the radical leftist agenda is winning because it is allowed to spew its filth upon America’s children, seemingly unchecked.

That is why you matter. Your vote matters. Your availability to run for local offices matters. Your ability to sit on the school board matters.

 

Notice: This article may contain commentary that reflects the author's opinion.