Boom: Sen. Hawley Takes the Fight against Disney to the Federal Level with This Brilliant Move

Governor DeSantis of Florida has zeroed in on Disney after it spoke out in support of transing the kids and letting creepy groomer teachers talk to kindergarteners about their genitals.



Rightly horrified both at the filth Disney was pushing and that it was doing so thanks to special privileges that it received from the state of Florida, DeSantis decided to strike back and revoke Disney’s special privileges as a way of punishing it. Disney has since lost billions in stock value as conservative consumers stop buying its products and fearful investors sell its shares.

And now Sen. Josh Hawley, one of the best MAGA populists in the Senate, is introducing a bill that would end Disney’s time of special privileges at the federal level by letting the woke company’s copyright protection finally lapse.

That’s a big deal: since the mouse became famous, Disney has received copyright protection, with Congress extending the time period during which a copyright can last so that Disney’s material never becomes public use. In fact, thanks to the old law, known to some as the “Mickey Mouse Protection Act,” Congress has extended copyrights to corporations for up to 120 years, protecting all Disney has done and making its works far more valuable and profitable.

But now Sen. Hawley wants to bring an end to that special copyright situation through the “Copyright Clause Restoration Act of 2022”. That bill would, Fox reports, “cap the length of copyrights given corporations by Congress to 56 years and retroactively implement this change on companies, including Walt Disney.

Hawley, speaking about the bill and the reasoning behind it in a statement to Fox News Digital, said:

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The age of Republican handouts to Big Business is over. Thanks to special copyright protections from Congress, woke corporations like Disney have earned billions while increasingly pandering to woke activists. It’s time to take away Disney’s special privileges and open up a new era of creativity and innovation.”

And Hawley isn’t alone in thinking that perhaps it’s time to bring Disney to heel. About a dozen GOP lawmakers suggested as much in an early April letter to Disney CEO Bob Chapek, saying:

You have even stated that your “goal as a company is for this law to be repealed by the legislature or struck down in the courts.” As a company, your goal should instead be to make a profit, provide job opportunities for hard-working Americans, and offer quality products and services to your customers – not cowering to a small political minority seeking to impose a fringe ideology on the rest of the country.

We condemn your outspoken attack on Florida’s common-sense protections for children and parents, and we worry your words will be weaponized and used to further divide and inflame our nation. We stand in opposition to the dangers posed by corporate wokeness, and we applaud the Florida legislature for giving children and families the tools to fight back against woke indoctrination. We urge you to reconsider your antagonistic comments



In another letter, about two dozen GOP legislators suggested that Disney’s copyright protection could soon come to an end, saying:

the Constitution gives Congress the authority to determine the length of time to protect copyrights. Further, it explicitly states that copyrights may not be permanent. Yet Disney’s long history of lobbying on this issue suggests that is its goal.

Biden can still veto any bill that the GOP gets rammed through the legislature. But those letters and Hawley’s bill show that the knives are out for Disney, even at the federal level.

At the very least, perhaps now’s the time that Disney’s copyright protections will expire; that Biden couldn’t veto.

By: Gen Z Conservative, editor of GenZConservative.com. Follow me on Parler and Gettr.

Notice: This article may contain commentary that reflects the author's opinion.