French President Delivers Some Bad News To Biden About Oil Strategy On Camera

French President Emmanuel Macron seemed to take President Joe Biden’s hopes and dreams of talking Arab nations into increasing their oil output and smashed them into a million pieces, right on camera.



I mean, it’s not like Biden needs additional help embarrassing himself, as he does that on a daily basis anyway, but this really makes him look like a bit of a dolt. Which he most assuredly is.

According to a report from the Western Journal, Macron had a chat with Biden on Monday at the G7 summit during an informal interaction which was then shared on video, said a report from Newsweek.

The president is attempting to find ways to increase oil production in order to try and address the current spike in gas prices that has folks all over the country ready to take out a second mortgage on their homes just to get a full tank of gas. That was a joke, by the way, I don’t think anyone is actually taking out a second mortgage for that purpose. At least I hope not.

High gas prices, along with a massive hike in inflation that has led to massive increases in the cost of normal, everyday goods, have had a dramatically negative impact on Biden’s administration, potentially setting up a massive red wave coming this November.

“Excuse me, sorry to interrupt,” Macron stated.

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“I had a call with MbZ,” Macron continued, which has been interpreted to be a reference to United Arab Emirates leader Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed al-Nahyan, according to reports coming out of the Daily Mail.

“He told me two things,” the French president said. “One, I’m at a maximum, maximum … This is what he claims.”

“Second, the Saudis can increase a little bit, by 150 [thousands barrels per day] or a little bit more, but they don’t have huge capacities at least before six months’ time,” he went on to say, according to the report from Newsweek.

While Macron might have actually had some more things he would have liked to have said, Biden’s national security adviser, Jake Sullivan, attempted to interrupt the little chat, according to a piece published by the New York Post.

“Careful. Maybe we should just step inside … because of the cameras,” Sullivan remarked, trying desperately to contain the situation.

The UAE put out a statement on Monday concerning its ability to produce more oil.

“In light of recent media reports, I would like to clarify that the UAE is producing near to our maximum production capacity based on its current OPEC+ production baseline (3,168 mbopd [thousand barrels of oil per day]) which UAE is committed by until the end of the agreement,” UAE Energy Minister Suhail Al Mazrouei went on to tell state news agency WAM on Monday, Newsweek reported.

There are two boogeymen that Biden likes to point the finger at when it comes to the current gas prices debacle, and when he isn’t blaming one, he’s blaming the other.

It’s a little game of “Pass the Buck” between Russian President Vladimir Putin and oil companies for amassing profits instead of lowering the price of gas.

Basically, Biden blames everyone else instead of taking responsibility for his own actions that contributed to the current crisis, like the outrageously large stimulus money spent last year and the closing down of the Keystone XL Pipeline.

Michael Wirth, chairman and CEO of Chevron, responded by saying Biden has made the situation worse,” the Western Journal reported.

“[Y]our Administration has largely sought to criticize, and at times vilify, our industry. These actions are not beneficial to meeting the challenges we face and are not what the American people deserve,” he stated in a letter addressed to Biden on June 21.

“Let’s work together. The American people rightly expect our country’s leaders and industry to address the challenges they are facing in a serious and resolute manner,” the letter continued.

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