Of Course: Kamala Makes Everything about Race and Gender in MSNBC Interview with Joy Reid

Why is cackling Kamala in power right now? How is it that no one else in a nation of over 330 million people could be found that could do a better job than the woman that can barely make it through a sentence without cackling like a maniac?



Well because Slow Joe promised to make a black woman his pick for the Vice President spot, as also happened with the Supreme Court, and so he chose Cackling Kamala from among the limited number of people from that demographic involved in national politics.

And the race- and gender-based pick has proven a disaster, as Kamala is more known for her cackle than anything that she’s managed to get done, namely because she hasn’t managed to get anything done.

But still the “black woman” line is what she stuck to in a recent interview with MNSBC’s Joy Reid, who claimed that her ‘The Culture Is: Black Women‘ interview with Kamala was special and more accurate because the two are of a shared race and gender.

Well Kamala wasn’t one to disagree and so it’s what she made the whole interview about race and gender.

In one part of it, for example, Kamala championed the idea of getting black women in politics, not pausing to say that only the best people should be involved, whatever their race or gender, and instead saying:

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“So I will tell you that, in terms of the spirit with which we approach it. And here’s the thing. We also were all born knowing the work that needs to be done, and so we will do it. And we will speak truth about the injustice. We will speak truth about the inequity. We will speak truth about the unfairness. But we also know our power. We are not going to let anyone take it from us. We understand the legitimacy of what we are fighting for, to say, let’s deal with discrimination.

“Let’s deal with the fact that black women are three times as likely to die in childbirth as other women, not to mention Native women, twice as likely, not to mention rural women, one and a half times likely. We understand what needs to be done, and we are prepared to do it. And that’s how I think about it. That’s how I think about it. We have to speak truth about what it is. And then, you know, I think that’s why you see all these women taking these roles of leadership, because they are prepared to lead. And I think we will all be better when they do.”

She then started cackling, a fitting end to any point made by the cackler in chief.

But that wasn’t the only time she made a race- and gender-centric point during the interview. She did so again when discussing Justice Katanji Jackson, saying:

“I will tell you, Joy, I experienced great joy when I watched this brilliant, phenomenal black woman jurist be so smart and just cut through the political gamesmanship that they were attempting to incite. And she just was composed, and as far as I’m concerned, was taking a whole lot of people to school. And I watched that with incredible joy, because it was just brilliance being displayed for the entire country to see. And I cannot wait to see — that will only be matched by the joy that I experience when I see her take the oath to be the next justice on the United States Supreme Court.”

Why not just say that she thought Katanji did a great job? Why did she feel the need to make it all about race and gender?

Because that’s what Kamala’s all about, the extent of her substance, unlike with Candace Owens, who is deeply thoughtful and treats her race and gender as inconsequential in comparison to her ideas.



By: Gen Z Conservative, editor of GenZConservative.com. Follow me on Facebook and Subscribe to My Email List

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