Concerned Mother: R.I. High Schools are Promoting Pedophilic Porn to Pupils

A Rhode Island mom named Nicole Solas is claiming, both in tweets and in a criminal complaint, that Rhode Island high schools are pushing a book containing gay, sometimes pedophilic pornography on students.

In an October 2nd tweet, Ms. Solas highlighted pages from the book, which is titled Gender Queer: A Memoir.


Then, eight days later, on October 10th, Ms. Solas posted an image of a criminal complaint she filed with the local police.

In the complaint, Ms. Solas alleges that the book contains “pornographic images” and was made available to minors by the high school.

The book in dispute, Gender Queer: A Memoir, was written and illustrated by an author named Maia Kobabe who uses the pronouns “e/em/eir” and whose Amazon author page describes her work as focusing on “themes of identity, sexuality, anti-fascism, fairy tales, and homesickness.

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Additionally, the Amazon description page for the book has this to say:

“…Maia’s intensely cathartic autobiography charts eir journey of self-identity, which includes the mortification and confusion of adolescent crushes, grappling with how to come out to family and society, bonding with friends over erotic gay fanfiction, and facing the trauma and fundamental violation of pap smears.”

Based on the images shared by Ms. Solas, the book contains numerous graphic images, including a scene in which a man performs oral sex on another.

Furthermore, according to The Federalist, the book contains a scene in which ” a young person (who appears to be a boy but is suggested to have female organs) is encouraged by her sister to “taste” herself.

And North Kingston isn’t the only high school displaying Kobabe’s pornographic book.



Again according to The Federalist, the book is “highlighted in the library of East Greenwich High School.” Ms. Solas decried that additional display in another tweet, pointing out that depicting children in sexual acts and distributing pornography to minors is a violation of state and federal law:

RIGL 11-9-1.1, which Ms. Solas cites in her October 11th tweet, makes it illegal to “publish, sell, offer for sale, loan, give away, or otherwise distribute any book, magazine, pamphlet, or other publication, or any photograph, picture, or film which depicts any child, or children, under the age of eighteen (18) years and known to be under the age of eighteen (18) years of age by the person, firm, association, or corporation in a setting which taken as a whole suggests to the average person that the child, or children, is about to engage in or has engaged in, any sexual act, or which depicts any child under eighteen (18) years of age performing sodomy, oral copulation, sexual intercourse, masturbation, or bestiality.”

However, the same law also provides that “artistic drawings, sketches, paintings, sculptures, or other artistic renditions, shall be exempt from the provisions of this section,” so it is unclear if Ms. Solas is accurate in claiming that Gender Queer and its display violated Rhode Island law. If the graphic images are found to be “art,” then they likely did not run afoul of the state statute.

18 U.S. Code § 2252, the relevant federal statute, makes the distribution and creation of child pornography a crime. DOJ guidance on the subject states that “Notably, the legal definition of sexually explicit conduct does not require that an image depict a child engaging in sexual activity. A picture of a naked child may constitute illegal child pornography if it is sufficiently sexually suggestive. Additionally, the age of consent for sexual activity in a given state is irrelevant; any depiction of a minor under 18 years of age engaging in sexually explicit conduct is illegal.

So, the aforementioned scene involving a young person “tasting” themself, along with other child sex acts readers claim are in the book, may run afoul of federal law, and Rhode Island schools may be in hot water for promoting and distributing such content.

However, as with the applicable Rhode Island statute, such material may be allowable if it is of “serious literary value (prong three of the Miller test),” so it is unclear if the book and distribution of it may have run afoul of federal law.

While Ms. Solas’s criminal complaint is certainly not spurious, it remains to be seen if the book is of “serious literary value.” If it is found to have such value, then the teachers and administrators behind pushing the book on students, and Maia herself, will likely avoid prosecution.

What is clear is that Rhode Island schools are pushing sexually graphic materials on underage students and parents such as Ms. Solas do not expect or want schools to share such materials with their pupils.

By: Gen Z Conservative, editor of GenZConservative.com. Follow me on Parler and Gettr.