White House Desperate. Has Biden Sign Law Banning Lynching

As our nation gets closer to the 2022 midterm elections, the democratic party’s election playbook will be used with more frequency.



Some of their worn-out, main points, they will again use, in their attempt to label the Republican party includes:

  1. Republicans are all racists
  2. They only lookout for the rich guy
  3. They want to end social security
  4. They are anti-women
  5. And now for 2022, they have all the phobics you can imagine

With President Joe Biden failing miserably during his first 16 months in office, the White House apparently decided they needed to do something, right away, trying to stop his precipitous drop in his national poll numbers.

For example, even the far-left NBC’s polling numbers are showing the 79-year-old, mentally declining, Chief Executive Officer of the United States’ approval, at only 40%.

So what’s the administration’s solution? Bring up an issue that deals with race or equity.

Are you proud to be an American?*
This poll gives you free access to our premium politics newsletter. Unsubscribe at any time.
This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

They chose to go with option A, with President Joe Biden signing a bill officially banning lynching at the federal level on Tuesday, comparing the horrific practice to the people who marched at the protests in Charlottesville.

“The same racial hatred that drove the mob to hang a noose brought that mob carrying torches out of the fields of Charlottesville just a few years ago,” Biden said, referring to the 2017 protests. “Racial hate isn’t an old problem. It’s a persistent problem.”

Yes, the president during his speech, tried to give the impression that lynching is still an issue in the United States in the year 2022, yet had to go back to a single gathering of outcasts, in 2017, to support his position.

Biden did his best to appear proud about signing the bill, right before delivering a speech about it.

“No federal law prohibited lynching. None. Until today,” he said.

Then is a strange point of reference which ended 72 years ago, Biden said that between 1877 and 1950, more than 4,400 black people were murdered by lynching.

“That’s a lot of folks, man, and a lot of silence for a long time,” he said.



Vice President Kamala Harris spoke after Biden signed the bill, noting that anti-lynching legislation was first introduced in 1900 and failed 200 times before it finally passed Congress in 2022.

“Lynching is and has always been a hate crime,” she said, and added, “Lynching is not a relic of the past. Racial acts of terror still occur in our nation, and when they do we must all have the courage to name them and hold the perpetrators to account.”

Harris then referenced a list of activists who worked to push the bill through Congress and also spoke about the importance of the black press.

“I’m going off-script for a moment about the importance of the black press. And the importance of making sure that we have the storytellers always in our community who we will support to tell the truth when no one else is willing to tell it,” he said.

After Harris’s speech, Biden returned to the microphone to emphasize the importance of a federal law banning lynching.

The new law makes it possible to prosecute a crime as a lynching when a conspiracy to commit a hate crime leads to death or serious bodily injury, according to the bill’s champion, Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill. The law lays out a maximum sentence of 30 years in prison and fines.

Wow, I am sure that America can sleep better tonight, now that this bill has been signed into law this year.

Fortunately, the racist Democrats in the south stopped this unthinkable violence against the black community several generations ago.

Since then our nation has elected the first black President.

In addition, several black Americans have served in other high governmental and corporate jobs, including the Attorney General and the United States Joint Chiefs of Staff (JCS).

By: Eric Thompson, editor of Eric Thompson Show.

Notice: This article may contain commentary that reflects the author's opinion.