Supreme Court Sides With Man Who Said Roundup Caused Cancer

The Supreme Court has decided not to hear an appeal brought by Bayer to stop thousands of cases alleging that the company’s weedkiller, Roundup, causes cancer.



Edwin Hardeman, a man from California, claims that he developed cancer as a result of using Roundup for years to manage poison oak, overgrowth, and weeds on his property in the San Francisco Bay Area. On Tuesday, the judges decided not to overturn a decision that awarded him $25 million and found in his favor. The lawsuit brought by Hardeman was used as a key test for thousands of other lawsuits of a similar nature.

BBC had these details to share about the Supreme Court’s ruling on the Roundup lawsuit:

Bayer is facing legal claims focused on the possible carcinogenic risks of glyphosate, the herbicide that Roundup and many other weedkillers are based on.

In 2015, the World Health Organization determined that glyphosate was “probably carcinogenic to humans”, but it remains approved in the US and elsewhere, including Europe.

In a separate case last week, a federal appeals court ruled that the US Environmental Protection Agency had not adequately considered the risks to humans and the environment caused by glyphosate, which could force another review by regulators.

Bayer, which acquired the Roundup brand as part of its $63bn takeover Monsanto in 2018, has maintained that the chemical is safe.

Bayer, which is possibly best known for its aspirins or other helpful drugs, also has a troubled past that disregarded the value of human life. The horrible chlorine gas that was employed in World War I was produced by Bayer, BASF, and Hoechst, three of the largest chemical companies in the world at the time. In 1925, the three of them banded together to form the massive cartel known as IG Farben, which went on to become the most successful company in the pharmaceutical, dye, and chemical industries worldwide.

In the early 1930s, IG Farben emerged as Adolf Hitler’s election campaign’s most significant financial backer, surpassing even the Nazi party itself. IG Farben gave Hitler and his Nazi party 400,000 marks in the crucial year leading up to Hitler’s rise to power, despite the fact that the company was first a little hesitant to do so because a number of its most important scientists were Jewish. This resulted in an abundance of rewards. Together with Bayer, IG Farben emerged as the single most profitable entity to derive financial benefit from German conquests during World War II.

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Dr. Otto Ambros a Nazi scientist and war criminal wrote a letter to the manager of IG Farben at the beginning of 1941. In the letter, he commended IG Farben’s cooperation with the SS for accelerating the construction of its Auschwitz-Buna facility.

Despite the fact that Auschwitz was the largest and most dreaded site in history for the extermination of human beings, its primary objective was to construct a massive IG Farben complex in order to manufacture synthetic gasoline and rubber as a part of Germany’s plans to conquer Europe and the rest of the world.

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