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Trump Approval Rating Hits Highest Point in Presidency


President Trump has been breaking records left and right. He broke another personal record on Sunday by reaching the highest approval rating during his entire time as president.


The poll was conducted by the Washington Post-ABC News and according to The Hill, the survey "found that 47 percent of registered voters approve of the job Trump is doing in the White House, a figure that represents a 5-point increase from April."


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Check out what else The Hill had to say:

Meanwhile, 44 percent of voting-age Americans said they approve of Trump's job performance, while 53 percent said they disapprove of it. Just 39 percent of voting-age Americans said they approved of Trump's job performance in April. 
The survey's release comes as the 2020 Democratic primary race begins to heat up, as candidates such as Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) and Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) gain ground on former Vice President Joe Biden in the polls. 
The economy served as the only issue where a majority said they approve of Trump's performance, according to the poll. Fifty-one percent of respondents said they approved of the way he has handled economic issues since entering the White House. Forty-two percent said they disapprove of his handling of the economy. 

The record high approval rating comes as no surprise. According to CNS News, President Trump set "a record 157,005,000 people were employed in June, the most since February and the 19th record of Trump's presidency, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported on Friday."

This wasn't the only notable achievement by President Trump. Check out what else CNS News reported:

And the economy added a strong 224,000 jobs in June, well above the estimate of 160,000.
 
The unemployment rate, the lowest in 50 years, ticked up a tenth of a point to 3.7 percent.
In June, the nation’s civilian noninstitutionalized population, consisting of all people age 16 or older who were not in the military or an institution, reached 259,037,000. Of those, 162,981,000 participated in the labor force by either holding a job or actively seeking one.
The 162,981,000 who participated in the labor force equaled 62.9 percent of the 259,037,000 civilian noninstitutionalized population. That's up a tenth of a point from May's 62.8 percent participation rate. The payroll taxes paid by people who participate in the labor force help support those who do not participate, so the higher this number, the better.
The participation rate reached a record high of 67.3 percent in early 2000; the highest it's been under Trump is 63.2 percent.
The number of Americans not in the labor force, meaning they did not have a job and were not looking for one, dropped by 158,000 last month to 96,057,000 but this number remains near historic highs, as the Baby Boom generation accelerates into retirement. 
Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult men (3.3 percent), adult women (3.3 percent), teenagers (12.7 percent), Whites (3.3 percent), Blacks (6.0 percent), Asians (2.1 percent), and Hispanics (4.3 percent) showed little or no change in June.
The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for April was revised down from +224,000 to +216,000, and the change for May was revised down from +75,000 to +72,000. After revisions, job gains have averaged 171,000 per month over the last 3 months.
And wages continue rising: In June, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls rose by 6 cents to $27.90, following a 9-cent gain in May. Over the past 12 months, average hourly earnings have increased by 3.1 percent.

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