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Trump & Pelosi Clash Over 2nd Stimulus Bill

With all the sensationalized news stories breaking every day surrounding the Biden family and each party's Presidential campaign, it might be easy to forget that America is still in the midst of the worst pandemic in modern history - especially in terms of the economy.

Though both the job and stock market continue to show promising growth (much faster than experts anticipated), there are still millions of Americans unemployed and financially burdened.


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The talks of a second stimulus check have gone on for months while both democrats and republicans point the political finger at each other. 

The fact of the matter is that President Trump endorsed a large spending bill, committing to do whatever it takes to keep Americans afloat while the effects of the Corona Virus begin to circle the drain.

The bill being proposed by Democrats proposed would entail President Trump and the Senate GOP signing off on a 2.2-trillion dollar stimulus bill - one that Senate Republicans say has too much fluff and is a far oversight of what individual families really need. 

Sahil Kapur of NBC News writes:

Meadows said "Senate Republicans have been very vocal" in opposing a dollar figure "even close to" the $1.8 trillion that Trump has backed.

"I can tell you this, that there are some in the Senate who would support it. Whether there's enough votes to get to the 60 vote threshold, that's up to Leader McConnell," Meadows told reporters outside the White House.

One sticking point remains the final cost of the bill: House Democrats want at least $2.2 trillion in spending; the president has endorsed going big; but Senate Republicans are reluctant.

While Democrats are opting for a bill of no less than just over 2-trillion dollars, Senate Republicans remain fiscally responsible with government spending. Public consensus points to the probability of hundreds of billions of dollars set aside for poorly run democratic cities. The President has been clear that he does not intend on "bailing out" governors who purposefully allowed their own cities to be burned and destroyed by violent, leftist mobs over the summer and early fall. 

Speaker of the House, Nancy Pelosi and Treasury Secretary, Steve Mnuchin met this afternoon in an attempt to come to an agreement. 

Erica Werner for The Washington Post reported:

President Trump seemed to downplay chances for an outcome, telling reporters that “Nancy Pelosi, at this moment, does not want to do anything that’s going to affect the election. And I think it will affect the election negatively for her. So we’ll see what happens.”

But Pelosi insisted in a call with Democratic colleagues that she did want to pass legislation before the election, saying she didn’t want to carry “the droppings of this grotesque elephant into the next presidency,” according to a person on the call who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss it. The elephant comment was first reported by Politico.

She spoke by phone for nearly an hour Monday afternoon with Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, with whom she’s been holding regular negotiating sessions over a bill between $1.8 trillion and $2.2 trillion. The two “continued to narrow their differences” and “the speaker continues to hope that, by the end of the day Tuesday, we will have clarity on whether we will be able to pass a bill before the election,” Pelosi spokesman Drew Hammill said on Twitter.

Werner later added, "Hammill said staff would be working around-the-clock, but the divisions appeared significant."

Americans who need assistance during this pandemic are being used as political leverage by Senate Democrats and Speaker Pelosi in an effort to bail out and fund nonessential interests.

Though negotiations will continue, it does not appear that a second stimulus bill will be passed prior to November 3rd.

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