Meloni Needs to Leave the Globalist EU if She Wants to Control Immigration

In another huge blow to the European Union globalists, Italy is set elected the most right-wing prime minister since the Mussolini era after a vote over the weekend.



Georgia Meloni is set to become Italy’s first female prime minister as her alliance of conservative parties, Brothers of Italy, secured 26 percent of the total vote in a near-final result. Last year, the party took just 4 percent, which goes to show just how attitudes in Europe are changing, and EU member nations are breaking away from Brussel’s clutches.

The news has sent globalists, including those in the European Union, into meltdown, as Meloni vowed to start putting Italy first. As the results were announced, Italian citizens were filmed climbing onto a government building and ripping down the European Union flag.

“The big goal that we set ourselves… was that Italians can again be proud to be Italians and to wave the tricolour flag,” said Meloni last night during her victory speech in Rome.

“If we are called to govern this nation, we will do it for everyone, we will do it for all Italians and we will do it with the aim of uniting the people.

“We won’t betray your trust. We are ready to lift Italy up.

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Throughout her campaign, Meloni has been vocal about her views on migrants, abortion and the LGBT agenda, promoting the mainstream media to attempt to disregard her with the usual slurs. The pro-EU BBC and the Financial Times labelled her “far-right”.

Meanwhile, the out-of-touch bureaucrats in the European Union are worried that Meloni’s almost certain victory could spell disaster for the bloc, particularly if Italy leaves so soon after Brexit. Iratxe Garcia Perez, president of the Socialists & Democrats group in the European Parliament said Meloni’s election would cast a “dark day” over Europe:

“Meloni’s post-fascism comes to Italy hand in hand and in alliance with EPP’s Forza Italia and ID’s Lega. Dark day for Italy and for Europe, she Tweeted.

But, as with Britain voting to leave the European Union, the public does not vote without reason, particularly considering the huge number of votes Meloni was able to amass compared to just 4 percent in the last election.

Italians, like many EU citizens, have become unhappy with the EU’s dictatorship rule over their country’s laws and governance. Each month, Italy is forced to deal with around 3,442 migrants arriving from Libya and the Middle East.

EU rules make it very difficult for member nations to remove illegal immigrants as its Dublin Agreement requires members to send migrants back to the country in which they first entered the European Union – which is, of course, usually impossible to know.

Legal immigration can also be a problem for EU member states, as all 444.7 million citizens are allowed complete free movement in or to any country within the bloc – including to live or work, visa-free. This means member countries with larger economies are often over-run with laborers from poorer nations.

Just before the election results were announced on Sunday, Pope Francis delivered a speech in Rome. He told Italians that “migrants are to be welcomed, accompanied, promoted and integrated”.

“Let us renew our commitment to building the future in accordance with God’s plan: a future in which migrants and refugees may live in peace and with dignity”.

But as young migrants now commit 1 out of every 2 crimes in their age group in Italy, its citizens are not living in peace and dignity and are distraught about the rate of change within their communities.

It is not yet known whether, upon her election, Meloni will follow Britain’s lead and leave the European Union, but if she wants to be able to control both legal and illegal immigration, it is the only way forward for her party.

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