R.I. School Superintendent Defends Pushing a Gay Porn Book on Students

On October 12th, I reported that a Rhode Island school was in hot water for allegedly pushing a book containing pornographic images depicting homosexual, pedophilic sex acts on students. For reference:



A Rhode Island mom named Nicole Solas is claiming, both in tweets and in a criminal complaint, that Rhode Island high schools are pushing a book containing gay, sometimes pedophilic pornography on students…

Based on the images shared by Ms. Solas, the book contains numerous graphic images, including a scene in which a man performs oral sex on another.

Furthermore, according to The Federalist, the book contains a scene in which ” a young person (who appears to be a boy but is suggested to have female organs) is encouraged by her sister to “taste” herself.”

Rather than back down and remove the book, the school’s superintendent, according to the Federalist and another concerned parent in the district, Erika Sanzi, has defended promoting the pornographic book.

Ms. Sanzi, in her Substack, claims that:

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When a concerned parent reached out to the superintendent via email with the subject line “inappropriate material in high school,” he defended the book on the grounds of students’ “sexual health.”

She then provides this email, which she alleges is from the superintendent:

He compares the pedophilic porn book to “the David” and claims that graphic, sexual scenes are “a valuable resource” for a “young adult audience.”

While he claims that the book is comparable to Michelangelo’s most famous work, many argue that it falls much closer to pornography than art. The Federalist, for example, notes that:

In case the common-sense conclusion that this book is overtly pornographic isn’t satisfying, Merriam-Webster stipulates that pornography is “the depiction of erotic behavior intended to cause sexual excitement,” a fitting description for the book given that, according to its Amazon description, it focuses on “bonding with friends over erotic gay fanfiction” and features sexually explicit images.

Ms. Sanzi then contrasts the superintendent’s response with what other schools have done when parents expressed concern over the content in questionable books:

The other cases of parents expressing concern and yes, outrage, over the sexually graphic content in their school libraries have led school boards and superintendents to call for a review and even pull the books in question until that review is complete. In this Rhode Island case, the superintendent doubles down and even compares this graphic novel with The David by Michelangelo.

While it is not currently clear why the school has chosen to defend this particularly graphic book, the Federalists Spencer Lindquist suggests that there might be dark motives at play:

If a school superintendent is really defending a pornographic book’s presence in a high school library, it — along with the glowing review from the School Library Journal — gives even more credence to the idea that there is a concerted push by the left to deconstruct sexual values and even normalize pedophilia.

This news of the North Kingston school district promoting and defending Gender Queer comes on news of other school districts pushing sexually graphic books on students.

As Ms. Sanzi reports, the Olathe Public School District in Kansas provided this book to a seventh-grade class:

Additionally, Asra Nomani, in her Substack, reports that a school in Virginia has also promoted graphic, sexually explicit books to young students:

[A] brave Fairfax High School mother, Stacy Langton, walked up to the podium at a regular meeting of the Fairfax County School Board, carrying with her two books and printouts from images in the books.

She had watched a Texas school board meeting at which parents read from two books that they had found in their school library — Lawn Boy by Jonathan Evison and Gender Queer by Maia Kobabe. She looked for the books at Fairfax High School, and she found them at the school and throughout the county — available to minors as young as seventh grade, or as young as 12 years old, at Robinson Secondary School…

She started putting yellow Post-It notes on the pages. “Both of these books include pedophilia, sex between men and boys.” One book included a fourth grade boy performing oral sex on an adult male.

“The other book has detailed illustrations of a man having sex with a boy,” she said, unfolding oversized photocopies of the x-rated drawings, one after the next as she explained them. “The illustrations include fellatio, sex toys, masturbation and violent nudity,” as well as pedophilia.

While the schools could potentially claim, as the Rhode Island school superintendent did, that the books are “art,” and thus not pornography, it is clear that many public schools in America are pushing books containing graphic sexual writing and imagery that is sometimes pedophilic on students.

However, the fight over content has not been entirely one-sided. While the school superintendent did allegedly defend promoting Gender Queer, Ms. Sanzi notes that it has since been removed from display. So, though schools continue to promote graphic books, the pushback has been successful to some degree.

By: Gen Z Conservative, editor of GenZConservative.com. Follow me on Parler and Gettr.