Trump Supported Axed British PM Boris Johnson from Start and Asked Theresa May ‘Didn’t Boris Want the Job’?

As a conservative Brit, I can’t help but feel there’s a semblance of a parallel between the globalist, liberal witch hunts Donald Trump has had to endure throughout his time in the White House and beyond, and the removal of Conservative Party’s Boris Johnson as prime minister.



Like many right-wing Brits, I felt politically homeless before Johnson took control of the Tories and vowed that he would finally “get Brexit done” after years of wishy-washy Conservative (said lightly) leaders like David Cameron and Theresa May.

Boris endured witch hunt after witch hunt by the British media, including from some of the more right-wing tabloids who had their sights set on a new agenda for the party. Of course, the left-wing media took real offense at Boris’ close relationship with then President Trump.

To this day, I am unable to fully comprehend why Boris was forced to resign, but I know the trouble stemmed from his office ‘party’ during the Covid-19 restrictions, which prohibited public gatherings. After this, the attacks were relentless and eventually his own MPs gave way – some of them far more willingly than others.

Long story short, Liz Truss is now the Tory leader and, by proxy, the British prime minister. In three weeks of leadership, she’s managed to destroy the British economy and push the country to the brink of a major financial crisis after she and her newly elected chancellor, Kwasi Kwarteng announced their so called ‘mini budget’ to (supposedly) ease the cost of living.

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To the British public’s dismay, Truss also announced that illegal migrants would for now on be referred to as ‘arriving passengers’ despite polls suggesting that immigration is one of the most pressing issues for most of the British public.

Like Trump, Boris was witch-hunted out of office. He was an unorthodox, slightly eccentric conservative who didn’t always play by the rules. Naturally, Trump took to him from day one.

According to a new book, Confidence Man: The Making of Donald Trump and the Breaking of America, written by Maggie Haberman, Donald Trump asked (then) prime minister Theresa May “Why isn’t Boris Johnson the prime minister? Didn’t he want the job?” during his first White House meeting with the British PM in which she was aiming to discuss a post-Brexit trade deal.

Trump continually voiced his support for Boris throughout his time as president, even dubbing him the ‘British Trump’ during a speech in 2019:

“Good man. He’s tough and he’s smart. They call him ‘Britain’s Trump’ and people say that’s a good thing. They like me over there! It’s what they wanted,” he said.

“Boris is good, he’s gonna get it done,” he added referring to Britain signing a final divorce paper with the European Union.

When the two leaders met later that year, Trump was reportedly so taken with Boris that he gave him his private cell phone number. Meanwhile Boris stepped up his side of the bromance:

“Actually he has many, many good qualities,” he said of Trump after a meeting in 2019.

“This is a guy who, when all is said and done, has got the US economy motoring along at about 3.6 per cent growth.

“We Tories, we Conservatives, I think, for too long have failed to talk up the agenda of free market economics, and we’ve failed to be positive about it…I know that not everybody agrees with everything Donald Trump says or does but on that he is having results, and we should pay tribute to that.

But now, as globalists on both sides of the pond have, for now, got the upper hand, we can only watch as the incompetent, weak leaders on either side continue to wreak havoc on our economies and destroy our societies.

Notice: This article may contain commentary that reflects the author's opinion.